A History of Golden Gate Park

Plans for Golden Gate Park in San Francisco began in the 1860s. The area then consisted of a stretch of sand and scores of dunes. Seeking to create a west coast version of the then work-in-progress Central Park in New York City, planners in San Francisco had to begin by creating a landscape and project plan they could work with. Development of the park began in earnest in 1875 with the commissioning of thousands of trees.

Trees were scouted from all over the globe to be shipped and planted in Golden Gate Park. Blue Gum Eucalyptus, Monterey Cypress, and Monterey Pine trees were planted over the course of several years in an attempt to stabilize the shifting sand dunes that constituted the landscape of the park. By 1880, over 150,000 tress were imported and planted.

Once the landscape was established, iconic buildings and man-made structures started to be built throughout the park. The Japanese Tea Garden made its debut in 1894, followed by the installation of several Dutch windmills almost a decade later. The windmills were, and still are used to circulate water throughout the park.

The 1920s brought about the building of the De Young Museum which displays art in a variety of forms. After many years of acting as home to exotic animals, the zebras, elephants, kangaroos, peacocks, and other wild creatures were sent away to more suitable housing outside of the park. However, the Bison Paddock remains to this day, housing buffalo for visitors to observe.

Golden Gate Park has suffered a number of serious weather-related encounters over the years. The infamous San Francisco earthquake in 1989 created damage to buildings and structures which demanded renovations. A storm in 1995 severely damaged the Conservatory of Flowers, causing repair work to be needed over the next eight years. Some sites undergoing repairs and renovations were not reopened until 2008.

Today, Golden Gate Park is home to several playgrounds for children, a popular merry-go-round, an aquarium, and acres of land to explore either on foot or via Segway tour. The land consists of dozens of well-maintained groves, meadows, and preserved lakes. At over 1,000 acres, Golden Gate Park is significantly larger than its inspiration Central Park. Each year, visitors enjoy the majestic beauty of the landscape, discover the culture and history residing in the buildings on the grounds, or experience the traditional public music festivals hosted by the park.

Most Expensive Neighborhoods In San Francisco

San Francisco is one of the hardest cities to live in because it is so expensive in some places but it is also home to a big population and plenty of tourists. Affordability and low rent are two of the most important factors that go into choosing a home or an apartment to live in. There are also those people that are successful enough to enjoy paying a hefty rent bill every month so they can live in the most expensive and most luxurious neighborhoods of San Francisco. Either way, whether you are look to pay low rent or high rent in the beautiful city of San Francisco, you should know what the most expensive neighborhoods are. You can either make sure to stay clear of them when searching for a place to call home or you can make those neighborhoods your first stop. Keep in mind that to afford the most expensive neighborhoods in San Francisco, it is recommended to have annual income of at least $100,000.

Most Expensive Neighborhoods In San Francisco

  • Russian Hill – The median rent for a one bedroom apartment is $3,800 per month.
  • South Beach – The median rent for a one bedroom apartment is $3,700 per month.
  • The Marina – The median rent for a one bedroom apartment is $3,700 per month.
  • Financial District – The median rent for a one bedroom apartment is $3,550 per month.
  • South Of Market – The median rent for a one bedroom apartment is $3,530 per month.
  • Pacific Heights – The median rent for a one bedroom apartment is $3,500 per month.
  • Telegraph Hill – The median rent for a one bedroom apartment is $3,500 per month.
  • Dogpatch/Mission Bay – The median rent for a one bedroom apartment is $3,450 per month.
  • Mission Dolores – The median rent for a one bedroom apartment is $3,400 per month.
  • Noe Valley – The median rent for a one bedroom apartment is $3,370 per month.
  • SOMA – The median rent for a one bedroom apartment is $2,964 per month.
  • Chinatown – The median rent for a one bedroom apartment is $2,695 per month.
  • North Beach – The median rent for a one bedroom apartment is $2,650 per month.
  • Downtown/Civic Center – The median rent for a one bedroom apartment is $2,506 per month.